Stephen King’s 20 Tips for Becoming a Frighteningly Good Writer

ARTICLE BY JON VIA BOOSTBLOGTRAFFIC.COM

Have you ever wished you could peer inside the mind of one of the greatest writers in the world and find out exactly what makes them tick?

Well… here’s your chance.

Stephen King has published 49 novels, all of them bestsellers. He has sold more than 350 million copies of his works. According to Forbes, he earns approximately $40 million per year, making him one of the richest writers in the world.

And now he’s going to tell you exactly how to become a frighteningly good writer.

Sort of.

In 2002, King temporarily abandoned writing horror novels, instead publishing On Writing, a little book chronicling his rise to fame and discussing exactly what he believes it takes to become a good writer. Since then, it’s become the most popular book about writing ever written, pulling in over 1000 reviews on Amazon and selling God only knows how many copies.

Here’s why:

The book is… magic.

I’ve read On Writing from cover to cover at least five times, and each time, I saw a noticeable improvement in my prose. For one, it teaches the fundamentals of the craft, which is something no writer should ignore, but it also sort of rubs off on you.

As you read through King’s life story, you can’t help but see that, to him, writing isn’t a chore. It’s an adventure through undiscovered worlds where no one knows what’ll happen next (not even him).

And it’s contagious.

You can’t read On Writing and not come away with a smile on your face. Where other writing books are focused on the mechanics of the written word, King shows you how to capture thejoy of the craft. You’ll find yourself wanting to write, not because of fame or fortune, but because it’s fun, and there’s nothing else you would rather do.

Personally, it’s inspired me more than any other book I’ve ever read, and if I could recommend only one book to bloggers, On Writing would be it. But don’t take my word for it. Below, I’ve collected a monster list of my favorite quotes from the book, and I also wrote down some of my own thoughts on exactly how they apply to bloggers.

If you enjoy them, grab yourself a copy of On Writing over at Amazon (aff). You won’t regret it.

Here are the quotes:

“I’ve written because it fulfilled me. Maybe it paid off the mortgage on the house and got the kids through college, but those things were on the side–I did it for the buzz. I did it for the pure joy of the thing. And if you can do it for joy, you can do it forever.”

In the back of their mind, every popular blogger harbors the same secret:

Given no other choices, we would happily do what we do for free.

Yes, the money and adulation and prestige that stems from a popular blog is nice, but it’s not what drives us to the keyboard. It’s not what wakes us up in the morning, excited and ready to write. It’s not what keeps us glued to a computer screen for 80% of our day.

No, it’s about the buzz. It’s about the joy. It’s about watching an idea take shape on the page and knowing your audience will love it.

All the other benefits are just a happy bonus.

“Writing isn’t about making money, getting famous, getting dates, getting laid, or making friends. In the end, it’s about enriching the lives of those who will read your work, and enriching your own life, as well.”

You know Zig Zigler’s old saying, “You can have everything you want in life, if you help enough other people get what they want?”

Well, it’s pretty much the secret to blogging.

If you want more traffic, ask yourself, “What can I give my readers today that would blow their minds? How can I turn their life upside down? What can I say that they couldn’t help but share?”

Answer those questions, and you won’t have to worry about traffic. You’ll get all you can handle.

“You can’t please all of the readers all of the time; you can’t please even some of the readers all of the time, but you really ought to try to please at least some of the readers some of the time.”

CONTINUE READING…

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4 thoughts on “Stephen King’s 20 Tips for Becoming a Frighteningly Good Writer

  1. Pingback: 17 Inspiring Writing Quotes | Wonder Sonder

  2. Pingback: Inspiration for Writers | Susan Wingate

  3. Pingback: What’s the point of writing if there isn’t anyone reading? « Dancing with Fireflies

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